Commodity Code

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Fullers earth original
broader
clay original
definition Clay-rich Earth material that has the capability to decolorize oil or other liquids without chemical treatment. Fuller's earth typically consists of palygorskite (attapulgite) or bentonite.
narrower
bentonite original
palygorskite original
notation
01.02.10.03
Feart
HREE original
broader
rare earth element original
definition See
narrower
dysprosium original
erbium original
europium original
gadolinium original
holmium original
lutetium original
terbium original
thulium original
ytterbium original
yttrium original
notation
02.01.03.01
HREE
LREE original
broader
rare earth element original
definition See
narrower
cerium original
lanthanum original
neodymium original
praseodymium original
promethium original
samarium original
notation
02.01.03.02
LREE
agate original
broader
chalcedony original
definition A variety of chalcedony having variegated colors arranged in stripes, blended in clouds, or showing mosslike forms. Sardonyx is a red-white or rarely red-white-black variant..
narrower
moss agate original
onyx original
notation
01.03.29.01.01
Agt
aggregate original
broader
industrial material original
definition Broad category for coarse particulate material used in construction, including sand, gravel, crushed stone, slag, recycled concrete and geosynthetic aggregates.
narrower
natural secondary aggregate original
primary aggregate original
recycled aggregate original
notation
01.01.01
Aggr
alumina original
broader
chemical oxide product original
definition Alumina is a fairly chemically inert and white chemical compound of aluminium and oxygen with the chemical formula Al2O3. It is the most commonly occurring of several aluminium oxides, and specifically identified as aluminium(III) oxide. It may also be called aloxide, aloxite, or alundum depending on particular forms or applications. Used as filler in plastic and cosmetics, as a catalyst. Corundum used as an abrasive is considered and industrial mineral.
notation
02.04.05.01
Alum
aluminium original
broader
metal original
definition Aluminium is a chemical element in the boron group with symbol Al and atomic number 13. It is a silvery white, soft, ductile metal. Aluminium is the third most abundant element (after oxygen and silicon), and the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust. It makes up about 8% by weight of the Earth's solid surface. Aluminium metal is so chemically reactive that native specimens are rare and limited to extreme reducing environments. Instead, it is found combined in over 270 different minerals.The chief ore of aluminium is bauxite.
notation
02.01.05
Al
aluminosilicate original
broader
industrial mineral original
definition Aluminosilicate minerals are minerals composed of aluminium, silicon, and oxygen, plus countercations. They are a major component of kaolin and other clay minerals.Andalusite, kyanite, and sillimanite are naturally occurring aluminosilicate minerals that have the composition Al2SiO5
narrower
andalusite original
kyanite original
pyrophyllite original
sillimanite original
notation
01.02.01
And
alunite original
broader
industrial mineral original
definition A trigonal hydrated aluminium potassium, sulfate mineral, KAl3(SO4)2(OH)6 mined for the manufacture of alum.
notation
01.02.02
Alu
amazonite original
broader
feldspar-gemstone original
definition A green variety of microcline feldspar.
notation
01.03.13.01
Amz
amber original
broader
gemstone original
organic material original
definition Amber is fossilized tree resin (not sap), which has been appreciated for its color and natural beauty since Neolithic times. Much valued from antiquity to the present as a gemstone, amber is made into a variety of decorative objects. Amber is used as an ingredient in perfumes, as a healing agent in folk medicine, and as jewelry.
notation
01.03.01
Amb
amethyst original
broader
quartz-gemstone original
definition Amethyst is a violet variety of quartz often used in jewelry.
notation
01.03.25.01
Amt
andalusite original
broader
aluminosilicate original
definition Orthorhombic Al2SiO5 aluminium neosilicate mineral occurring in aluminous metamorphic rocks.
notation
01.02.01.01
Anda
anhydrite original
broader
evaporite original
definition Anhydrite is a relatively common sedimentary mineral that forms massive rock layers. Anhydrite does not form directly, but is the result of the dewatering of the rock forming mineral Gypsum (CaSO4-2H2O). This loss of water produces a reduction in volume of the rock layer and can cause the formation of caverns as the rock shrinks.
notation
01.02.15.01
Anhd
anthophyllite original
broader
asbestos-amphibole original
definition An orthorhombic magnesium iron inosilicate hydroxide amphibole mineral: Mg2Mg5Si8O22(OH)2, used in asbestos cement, composite flooring, roofing material and for insulation.
notation
01.02.04.01.01
Ant
anthracite original
broader
coal original
definition Anthracite is a hard, compact variety of mineral coal that has a high luster. It has the highest carbon content, the fewest impurities, and the highest calorific content of all types of coal (compared to bituminous coal and lignite).
notation
01.01.05.01.01.01
Anthr
antimony original
broader
metalloid original
definition Antimony is a chemical element with symbol Sb (from Latin: stibium) and atomic number 51. A lustrous gray metalloid, it is found in nature mainly as the sulfide mineral stibnite (Sb2S3). Antimony compounds have been known since ancient times and were used for cosmetics; metallic antimony was also known, but it was erroneously identified as lead.
notation
02.02.01
Sb
apatite original
broader
industrial mineral original
definition Apatite is a group of calcium phosphate minerals, usually referring to hydroxylapatite, fluorapatite and chlorapatite, named for high concentrations of OH−, F− and Cl− ions, respectively, in the crystal. The formula of the admixture of the four most common endmembers is written as Ca10(PO4)6(OH,F,Cl)2, and the crystal unit cell formulae of the individual minerals are written as Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, Ca10(PO4)6(F)2 and Ca10(PO4)6(Cl)2.
notation
01.02.03
Apat
apatite-gemstone original
broader
gemstone original
definition Apatite is a group of phosphate minerals, usually referring to hydroxylapatite, fluorapatite and chlorapatite, named for high concentrations of OH−, F− and Cl− ions, respectively, in the crystal. The formula of the admixture of the four most common endmembers is written as Ca10(PO4)6(OH,F,Cl)2, and the crystal unit cell formulae of the individual minerals are written as Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, Ca10(PO4)6(F)2 and Ca10(PO4)6(Cl)2.
notation
01.03.02
ApatGe
aquamarine original
broader
beryl original
definition A blue- or turquoise-colored variety of beryl.
notation
01.03.03.01
AgM
arsenic original
broader
metalloid original
definition Arsenic is a chemical element with symbol As and atomic number 33. Arsenic occurs in many minerals, usually in conjunction with sulfur and metals, and also as a pure elemental crystal. Arsenic is a metalloid. It can exist in various allotropes, although only the gray.form has important use in industry.
notation
02.02.02
As
asbestos original
broader
industrial mineral original
definition One of six naturally occurring silicate minerals that occur in long (roughly 1:20 aspect ratio), thin, flexible fibrous crystals.
narrower
asbestos-amphibole original
asbestos-serpentine original
notation
01.02.04
Asb
asbestos-amphibole original
broader
asbestos original
definition Asbestos formed predominantly of amphibole-group minerals, anthophyllite, crocidolite, riebeckite, amosite, tremolite, actinolite.
narrower
anthophyllite original
crocidolite original
notation
01.02.04.01
AsbA
asbestos-serpentine original
broader
asbestos original
definition Asbestos formed predominantly of serpentine-group minerals (chrysotile)
narrower
chrysotile original
notation
01.02.04.02
AsbS
asphalt original
broader
liquid hydrocarbons original
definition Asphalt or bitumen is a sticky, black and highly viscous liquid or semi-solid form of petroleum. It may be found in natural deposits or may be a refined product
notation
01.01.05.03.01
Asph
barium original
broader
metal original
definition Barium is a chemical element with symbol Ba and atomic number 56. It is the fifth element in Group 2, a soft silvery metallic alkaline earth metal. Because of its high chemical reactivity barium is never found in nature as a free element. Its hydroxide was known in pre-modern history as baryta; this substance does not occur as a mineral, but can be prepared by heating barium carbonate.
notation
02.01.07
Ba
baryte original
broader
industrial mineral original
definition An orthorhombic barium sulfate mineral BaSO4 used as a filler or extender, an addition to industrial products, or a weighting agent in petroleum well drilling mud.
notation
01.02.05
Brt
basalt original
broader
dimension stone original
definition Commercial basalt and traprock includes igneous rocks that are too fine grained to be termed “black granite.” This category includes extrusive igneous rocks, such as andesite, basalt, or dacite, and intrusive igneous rocks, such as amphibolites, diabase, diorites, fine-grained gabbros, peridotites and pyroxenites.
notation
01.01.03.01
Bas
base metal original
broader
metal original
definition In chemistry, the term base metal is used informally to refer to a metal that oxidizes or corrodes relatively easily and reacts variably with diluted hydrochloric acid (HCl) to form hydrogen. Examples include iron, nickel, lead and zinc. Copper is also considered a base metal because it oxidizes relatively easily, although it does not react with HCl.
narrower
cobalt original
copper original
lead original
nickel original
zinc original
notation
02.01.01
BM
bauxite original
broader
direct shipping ore original
definition A residual clay deposit, aluminous laterite, derived from the alteration of basalt lava, containing at least 50% Al(OH)3; used as a source of aluminium and as feedstock for ferrous aluminium sulphate water purification material. Used as proppant for hydraulic fracturing; used as abrasive.
notation
01.01.02.01
Baux
bentonite original
broader
Fullers earth original
definition Bentonite is an absorbent aluminium phyllosilicate, essentially impure clay consisting mostly of montmorillonite.
notation
01.02.10.03.02
Bent
beryl original
broader
gemstone original
definition Beryl is often unknown to the general public, even the gemstone-buying public. However, it is one of the most important gem minerals. Beryl is colorless in pure form; it is the many different impurities that give beryl its varied coloration.
narrower
aquamarine original
emerald original
heliodor original
morganite original
notation
01.03.03
Brl
beryllium original
broader
metal original
definition Beryllium is the chemical element with the symbol Be and atomic number 4. Because any beryllium synthesized in stars is short-lived, it is a relatively rare element in the universe. It is a divalent element which occurs naturally only in combination with other elements. Notable gemstones which contain beryllium include beryl (aquamarine, emerald) and chrysoberyl.
notation
02.01.06
Be
bismuth original
broader
metal original
definition Bismuth is a chemical element with symbol Bi and atomic number 83. Bismuth, a pentavalent other metal, chemically resembles arsenic and antimony. Elemental bismuth may occur naturally, although its sulfide and oxide form important commercial ores.
notation
02.01.08
Bi
black coal original
broader
coal original
definition Bituminous coal or black coal is a moderately hard coal containing higher carbon and fewer impurities than lignite coal but of poorer quality than anthracite. Its coloration can be black or sometimes dark brown; often there are well-defined bands of bright and dull material within the seams. These distinctive sequences, which are classified according to either "dull, bright-banded" or "bright, dull-banded", is how bituminous coals are stratigraphically identified.
notation
01.01.05.01.01.02
BlcC
borate original
broader
industrial mineral original
definition Earth material that contains economically significant amounts of minerals containing a borate anion group, one of BO3, B2O5, B3O6, B2O4 , or [B(O,OH)4].
notation
01.02.06
Bor
boron original
broader
metalloid original
definition Boron is a chemical element with symbol B and atomic number 5. Because boron is produced entirely by cosmic ray spallation and not by stellar nucleosynthesis, it is a low-abundance element in both the solar system and the Earth's crust. Boron is concentrated on Earth by the water-solubility of its more common naturally occurring compounds, the borate minerals. These are mined industrially as evaporites, such as borax and kernite.
notation
02.02.03
B
brick clay original
broader
clay original
definition End use is determined by the properties of the material therefore it is a valid commodity type
notation
01.02.10.01
Bclay
bromine original
broader
non metal original
definition Bromine (from Greek: βρῶμος, brómos, meaning "strong-smelling" or "stench")[3] is a chemical element with the symbol Br, and atomic number of 35. It is in the halogen group.
notation
02.03.01
Br
brown coal original
broader
coal original
definition Lignite, often referred to as sub-bituminous or brown coal, is a soft brown combustible sedimentary rock that is formed from naturally compressed peat. It is considered the lowest rank of coal due to its relatively low heat content. It is mined in Bulgaria, Kosovo, Greece, Germany, Poland, Serbia, Russia, Turkey, the United States, Canada, India, Australia and many other parts of Europe and it is used almost exclusively as a fuel for steam-electric power generation. 25.7% of Germany's electricity comes from lignite power plants, while in Greece lignite provides about 50% of its power needs. -
notation
01.01.05.01.01.03
BrnC
cadmium original
broader
metal original
definition Cadmium is a chemical element with the symbol Cd and atomic number 48. This soft, bluish-white metal is chemically similar to the two other stable metals in group 12, zinc and mercury.
notation
02.01.09
Cd
calcite original
broader
industrial mineral original
definition A trigonal calcium carbonate mineral CaCO3 used in large crystal form for optics and as compound additive for soil remediation, soil stabilization and concrete repair.
notation
01.02.07
Cal
carbonaceous material original
broader
organic material original
definition Accummulation rich in, or composed of carbon, normally derived from decomposed plant or animal matter.
narrower
coal original
peat original
notation
01.01.05.01
CaMa
carnallite original
broader
evaporite original
definition Carnallite is named for Prussian mining engineer, Rudolph von Carnall. It forms in marine evaporite deposits where sea water has been concentrated and exposed to prolonged evaporation.
notation
01.02.15.02
Carn
carnelian original
broader
chalcedony original
definition A variety of chalcedony colored by iron oxide, which is commonly used as a semi-precious gemstone. The color can vary greatly, ranging from pale orange to an intense almost-black coloration. When Carnelian grades into brown it is known as Sard. Some very dark brown Carnelian can be classified as Jasper. The distinction between these is very fine and relies more on visual appearance than scientific analysis. As a result, it is very possible that one man's Carnelian may be another man's Sard, Agate or Jasper.
notation
01.03.29.01.02
Carnl
cassiterite-gemstone original
broader
gemstone original
definition Cassiterite is a mineral that has ornately faceted specimens with high luster. It is generally opaque, but its luster and multiple crystal faces cause a nice sparkle.
notation
01.03.04
CassGe
cerium original
broader
LREE original
definition Cerium is a chemical element with symbol Ce and atomic number 58. It is a soft, silvery, ductile metal which easily oxidizes in air.
notation
02.01.03.02.01
Ce
cesium original
broader
metal original
definition Caesium or cesium[note 1] is a chemical element with symbol Cs and atomic number 55. It is a soft, silvery-gold alkali metal with a melting point of 28 °C (82 °F), which makes it one of only five elemental metals that are liquid at or near room temperature. - Caesium or cesium[note 1] is a chemical element with symbol Cs and atomic number 55. It is a soft, silvery-gold alkali metal with a melting point of 28 °C (82 °F), which makes it one of only five elemental metals that are liquid at or near room temperature
notation
02.01.10
Cs
chalcedony original
broader
silica-gemstone original
definition Chalcedony is a cryptocrystalline form of silica, composed of very fine intergrowths of the minerals quartz and moganite.
narrower
agate original
carnelian original
chrysoprase original
notation
01.03.29.01
Chlce
chemical compound product original
broader
produced commodity original
definition Commodity is a chemical compound that is extracted/processed from an ore material mined from the Earth
narrower
chemical oxide product original
lime original
nitrate original
potash original
soda ash original
notation
2.04
MiPr